Introducing #ArtPit by Heidi Norrod

I had the opportunity to connect with Heidi Norrod, the maven of past Twitter Pitch parties including #AdPit and #KidPit. She truly lives the adage of writers helping writers. She is embarking on a new online pitch event designed for artists, illustrators, and graphic novelists. Heidi decided to share the news with Novel Pitch first and we are excited to share it with all of you! From Heidi –

Introducing #ArtPit

If you follow me on twitter or follow my blogs, then you probably know about Adult Pitch (more commonly known as #AdPit). And if, you are super stalker-ish, then you know that back in May 2015 #AdPit had a little sister event called Kid Pitch (or more commonly known as #KidPit).

What you don’t know is that #AdPit and #KidPit found their cousin, Art Pitch or #ArtPit. Yep! That’s right! I’d like to introduce you to #ArtPit now.

What is #ArtPit?

It’s a twitter pitch party, yeah I know, there are about a gazillion of these things but – #ArtPit is different. It’s only for author/illustrators, illustrators and/or graphic novelists.

When is #ArtPit?

Right now, it’s slated to be on November 17th, 2015. It will begin at 9:00 a.m. EST (Eastern Standard Time) and it will last through 4:00 p.m. EST. (You can find any updates on this pitch opportunity and others at the Pitch Opportunity page)

Great! Tell me what I have to do to participate.

Sure thing! All you have to do is pitch, sometimes called twitching in the twittersphere. I can see your foreheads wrinkling from all the way over here, but it’s okay. Relax and take another hit of caffeine, I’ll explain more.

  • A twitter pitch (a twitch) is a tweet. 140 characters, including the hashtag (in this case #ArtPit) that you can use to grab patrolling agents and editors that search the hashtag on the day of the event. — Wait, wait! Don’t hyperventilate just yet. Check out this practice twitch for my own chapter book, which I’ve authored and illustrated.
  • Someone is hiding in Boris Bear’s house! He doesn’t like it, so he set out to find them. #ArtPit #CB –(Plus, add a twitpic showing off your artwork)
  • (If only twitching as an illustrator) Arthur’s book is missing! Where is it? There! Behind his desk. Look at those cobwebs! #ArtPit #Illu — (Add the matching sample illustration for your twitch)
  • Now, let me break that pitch down for you. — The words should entice industry professionals into wanting to read more. The hashtag #ArtPit insures that your work is seen on the appropriate twitter timeline. The hashtag #CB is just to help patrolling professionals know that my particular story that I’m pitching is a Chapter Book (hence the CB). And finally, make sure that you allow yourself room to display a sample of the artwork associated with the work that you are hoping to snag a pro’s eye on.
    • A few hashtag samples for your reference.
      • #CB – Chapter Book
      • #ER – Early Reader
      • #illu – Illustrator Only
      • #PB – Picture Book
      • #GN – Graphic Novel
      • #BB – Board Book

(You can find more tips on pitching on twitter with the Novel Pitch series on the subject. Just click here. )

Rules for the day:

  1. Only pitch completed manuscripts. Any genre and any age range is welcome. Illustrators, just note that you need varying samples of art to post for each of your six posts.
  2. Never, ever star or favorite a tweet unless you are an industry professional.
  3. If you see a pitch that you like, shot the artist/author an @ mention and let them know. They’ll appreciate it. Refrain from ReTweeting, let’s give everyone an equal chance to be seen.
  4. You may pitch once an hour for the duration of the contest. That’s six pitches for the whole day for each manuscript you wish to enter. Yes, this means that you may pitch more than one manuscript, as long as they all meet the requirements.
  5. Every twitch must include all the parts; the pitch, the art sample, and both hashtags.
  6. Bullying, spamming, and any other types of unprofessional behavior will get you blocked and reported.
  7. This contest is open to everyone, no formal invitations will go out. No lists of participants will be posted.

Things to remember:

  1. Always be professional.
  2. Twitter pitch opportunities are not the be all end all. Just because you don’t get a star, doesn’t mean your work isn’t good, I’m sure it’s great! Just remember slush piles are ALWAYS there, and you can query that way too.
  3. Mix up your pitches throughout the day, change your pitch, change your art sample. Twitter doesn’t allow carbon copy tweets anyway, so experiment. And besides, interested professionals often click on a profile to see if your have other variations.
  4. Always do your research before submitting to anyone. Scams are prevalent, and you should always learn as much as you can about anyone you send your work to. Remember to use the preditors & editors website.
  5. If you are unsure about anything, please ask questions. Whether it is to me as the host, or to any requesting professional. Communication is good, just keep it professional and brief.
  6. Make sure you have a link to your artist portfolio somewhere in/on your twitter profile page.
  7. Share the love. Support your fellow artists.

Why am I doing this?

You’re reading this and thinking what do I get out of it, I know it. So, I’ll answer. I get satisfaction. Both of my other two contests/conferences, #AdPit and #KidPit have a high success rate of matching potential bestsellers to the agent/editor of their dreams. Though, I am disheartened by the lack of accessibility for author/illustrators and illustrators to contests. There are multitudes of contests out there for writers, but artists tend to get left a bit behind. I know. I know because I’m an author and an illustrator. I also write non-fiction where I need to draw diagrams and such. I’m well aware that many twitter pitch contests even frown at adding graphics to your twitches in their contests (usually they cry that graphics slow the feed down), but for me, that’s great news. If your art can grab attention where you may slip a bit with the words, then that means you still get noticed. You still have a chance that you may have missed because you weren’t able to get the words just right.

As author/illustrators – as artists – as illustrators, we often turn to art because words fail us, I know I do, so it’s time to showcase to the world that artists can excite readers just as much and as easily as writers. Many high-end editors, at the big publishers, say that they often reject picture book/chapter book/and such manuscripts because the words just don’t draw enough of a picture for them – as illustrators too, we have an advantage there, because when our words fail us at being ‘not descriptive enough’ we have our art to back us up.

So, come join me on November 17th and let’s make artist history!

Heidi Norrod

For More about Heidi –

Calling the mountains of Tennessee home, gives Heidi plenty of fantastic nature places to write by longhand, which is her preferred method. She writes everything by hand first her screenplays and her stories, it’s just more fun. She’s also an illustrator and is trying her hand at a historical horror graphic novel. She’s written mainly middle grade, and written and illustrated a chapter book series about Al Gator’s mysteries in the swamp, and another fun adventure series with Boris the Bear.

You can find Heidi lurking on social media when she should be writing/illustrating alot of places – www.twitter.com/hrnorrod, www.facebook.com/heidi.norrod, www.hrnorrod.deviantart.com, www.heidinorrod.webs.com, www.heidinorrod.wordpress.com, and others like LinkdIn and Google+ but those two scare her and she isn’t on there very often.

As a BONUS Heidi even provided a sample pitch.

A pitch – I have never officially pitched face-to-face – but, I was invited to pitch by email, so I added that one.

Rikki marched into church on Sunday not to find God, but to hunt a killer. The murderer was sitting right there in the congregation praying. She was going to find Granny’s killer, and she was going to make sure he or she paid. MURDER ON A SUNDAY is the first book in a planned seven book new adult series introducing Criminology major Rikki Yuan’s mystery solving adventures.

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